Someone on our side: Advocacy for disabled children and young people

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Date of publication:  03 Oct 2011 Authors:  Anita Franklin Publisher:  The Children Society Publication type:  Report / Study / Data

The Children’s Society conducted this study, which focuses on the under-explored area of advocacy for disabled children and young people across England. The study’s key message is that advocacy for disabled children and young people is important and can lead to considerable improvements, both in their and their families’ lives. The advocacy process itself can bring significant benefits to the individual child, through improved confidence, self-esteem and independence. Advocacy has been defined as a way of facilitating a child or young person’s participation in decision-making. Advocates act on the permission and instructions of children and young people, and express the child’s views even if the advocate does not think that these views are in the child’s best interests. Specific policy recommendations include the following. To ensure that all disabled children and young people can benefit from the positive outcomes that independent advocacy offers, central and local government should work towards: 1. Increasing the availability of specialist advocacy provision for disabled children and young people 2. Improving the awareness of advocacy services for disabled children and young people 3. Monitoring the availability and accessibility of advocacy services and ensuring that learning from individual advocacy cases leads to improvements in services for all disabled children and young people 4. Ensuring access to advocacy for disabled children and young people placed away from home

Attached files: 
Total number of pages: 
8
Series this is part of: 
Language(s) of materials: 
English
Country(s) this content is relevant to: 
United Kingdom

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